Need a laugh? The Best 5 Funny Poems for Kids

3 min read

Kids love to laugh and clown around. It’s good for their soul!

Many great poets have incorporated humor into their poems to play right into this natural instinct.

You wanna make your kids laugh? Here a compilation of the best 5 funny poems for kids:

 

The Adventures of Isabel, by Ogden Nash

Isabel met an enormous bear,
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t care;
The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous,
The bear’s big mouth was cruel and cavernous.
The bear said, Isabel, glad to meet you,
How do, Isabel, now I’ll eat you!
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry.
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up,
Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up.
Once in a night as black as pitch
Isabel met a wicked old witch.
the witch’s face was cross and wrinkled,
The witch’s gums with teeth were sprinkled.
Ho, ho, Isabel! the old witch crowed,
I’ll turn you into an ugly toad!
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry,
She showed no rage and she showed no rancor,
But she turned the witch into milk and drank her.
Isabel met a hideous giant,
Isabel continued self reliant.
The giant was hairy, the giant was horrid,
He had one eye in the middle of his forhead.
Good morning, Isabel, the giant said,
I’ll grind your bones to make my bread.
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She nibled the zwieback that she always fed off,
And when it was gone, she cut the giant’s head off.
Isabel met a troublesome doctor,
He punched and he poked till he really shocked her.
The doctor’s talk was of coughs and chills
And the doctor’s satchel bulged with pills.
The doctor said unto Isabel,
Swallow this, it will make you well.
Isabel, Isabel, didn’t worry,
Isabel didn’t scream or scurry.
She took those pills from the pill concocter,
And Isabel calmly cured the doctor.

 

The Dentist and the Crocodile, by Roald Dahl

The crocodile, with cunning smile, sat in the dentist’s chair.
He said, “Right here and everywhere my teeth require repair.”
The dentist’s face was turning white. He quivered, quaked and shook.
He muttered, “I suppose I’m going to have to take a look.”
“I want you,” Crocodile declared, “to do the back ones first.
The molars at the very back are easily the worst.”
He opened wide his massive jaws. It was a fearsome sight––
At least three hundred pointed teeth, all sharp and shining white.
The dentist kept himself well clear. He stood two yards away.
He chose the longest probe he had to search out the decay.
“I said to do the back ones first!” the Crocodile called out.
“You’re much too far away, dear sir, to see what you’re about.
To do the back ones properly you’ve got to put your head
Deep down inside my great big mouth,” the grinning Crocky said.
The poor old dentist wrung his hands and, weeping in despair,
He cried, “No no! I see them all extremely well from here!”
Just then, in burst a lady, in her hands a golden chain.
She cried, “Oh Croc, you naughty boy, you’re playing tricks again!”
“Watch out!” the dentist shrieked and started climbing up the wall.
“He’s after me! He’s after you! He’s going to eat us all!”
“Don’t be a twit,” the lady said, and flashed a gorgeous smile.
“He’s harmless. He’s my little pet, my lovely crocodile.”

 

Mrs. Mitchell’s Underwear, by Dennis Lee

Mrs. Mitchell’s underwear
Is dancing on the line;
Mrs. Mitchell’s underwear
Has never looked so fine.

Mrs. Mitchell’s hates to dance
She says it’s not refined.
But Mrs. Mitchell’s underwear
Is prancing on the line.

With a polk-dotted polka
And a tangled tango too,
Mrs. Mitchell’s underwear
Is like a frilly zoo!

 

Gas, by C.K. Williams

Wouldn’t it be nice, I think, when the blue-haired lady in the doctor’s
waiting room bends over the magazine table
and farts, just a little, and violently blushes, wouldn’t it be nice if intesti-
nal gas came embodied in visible clouds
so she could see that her really quite inoffensive pop had only barely
grazed my face before it drifted away?
Besides, for this to have happened now is a nice coincidence because not
an hour ago, while we were on our walk,
my dog was startled by a backfire and jumped straight up like a horse
bucking and that brought back to me
the stable I worked on weekends when I was twelve and a splendid
piebald stallion who whenever he was mounted
would buck just like that, though more hugely, of course, enormous,
gleaming, resplendent, and the woman,
her face abashedly buried in her Elle now, reminded me I’d forgotten
that not the least part of my awe
consisted of the fact that with every jump he took the horse would pow-
erfully fart, fwap, fwap, fwap,
something never mentioned in the dozens of books about horses and
their riders I devoured in those days.
All that savage grandeur, the steely glinting hooves, the eruptions driven
from the creature’s mightly innards:
breath stopped, heart stopped, nostrils madly flared, I didn’t know if I
wanted to break him or be him.

 

Daddy Fell Into the Pond, by Alfred Noyes

Everyone grumbled. The sky was grey.
We had nothing to do and nothing to say.
We were nearing the end of a dismal day,
And then there seemed to be nothing beyond,
Then
Daddy fell into the pond!

And everyone’s face grew merry and bright,
And Timothy danced for sheer delight.
“Give me the camera, quick, oh quick!
He’s crawling out of the duckweed!” Click!

Then the gardener suddenly slapped his knee,
And doubled up, shaking silently,
And the ducks all quacked as if they were daft,
And it sounded as if the old drake laughed.
Oh, there wasn’t a thing that didn’t respond
When Daddy fell into the pond!

Did you have a good laugh with your child? What was his or her/ your preferate one? If we forgot one that you think should figure on this list, just add it in the comments!